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Let’s Focus: Shapes, Textures, Hollows, Metals

March 15th - March 17th
Sheila Checkoway |

Perfect for those with beadmaking experience.  Instructor Sheila Checkoway builds on your solid foundation and fundamentals of soft glass manipulation.  Students will learn these enhanced glass bead skills through instructor demonstrations, discussions and lots of hands-on torch time. All materials are included.  Students will complete many beads with these various techniques.

This class meets Friday, 6:00- 9:00pm, Saturday and Sunday, 10:00am-6:00pm

Day One focuses on improving how you wrap hot glass, mastering the bicone shape elongated and stubby, applying surface texture in various ways, using copper and silver foils for a verdigris finish.

Day Two includes making hollow glass beads with the disc method, and applying texture for a melon shape bead, learning to use reduction glass with encasing and techniques.  

Each day includes seven workshop hours with a one hour-lunch break and stretch breaks.

What to Expect: Flameworking requires a little practice at heat control with the torch to create successful pieces. After demonstrations, expect to make some successful objects in this class, and a couple failures, while gaining more confidence and skill in the studio. Read more about how to prepare for class on our Registration Info page. 

Eligibility: Students must have 1-2 years beadmaking experience with soft glass COE 104, are comfortable with the torch, able to load and wrap glass into bead shapes, and able to remove beads from mandrels. Open to ages 14 and up.

Pick-up: The glass needs to cool down overnight, so the students will have to return to UrbanGlass once notified to pick up their work. 

Class Schedule
  • 3 Sessions: March 15 — March 17
    Friday, 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Location
UrbanGlass Studio
647 Fulton St
Brooklyn, NY 11217
Instructor

Sheila Checkoway

‘Making glass beads is my passion.’  Sheila finds inspiration in nature, her extensive world travels, anywhere and everywhere!  Her style is described as a mixture of organic and bling: other lampworkers and jewelry designers describe her beads as ‘different’ and ‘unique’.

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