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Cold Working to Save the World

May 3rd - May 5th
Jenny Crescuillo |

In this class, students will learn  what the entire cold shop has to offer.  Students will gain a deeper understanding of the potential applications of each tool.  Beginners and advanced students will learn how to use cold working to go beyond basic punty grinding or texturing. The cold shop is not only a place to finish pieces from other studios, but is a place to create artwork from start to finish. We will learn how to safely use each tool and will focus on empowering students to experiment as they gain experience. We will cover techniques ranging from basic grinding and polishing, sculptural carving, to more advanced surface patterning, and hand grinding, based on student interest.  But beyond mastering specific techniques, this class will focus on thinking of new ways to use cold working to create art.  Each student will leave with a repertoire of new skills and a new perspective on cold working. 

This class meets Friday, 6:00-9:00pm, Saturday and Sunday, 10:00am-6:00pm

What to Expect:Students can expect to watch a number of demonstrations and have time to practice coldworking on three objects using different techniques. Tools and materials will be provided. The cold shop equipment can be loud, and all equipment is water fed. Students should wear waterproof shoes, an apron, safety glasses, and ear protection are provided. 

 Read more about how to prepare for class on our Registration Info page. 

Eligibility: No previous experience required. Open to ages 14 and up.

Class Schedule
  • 3 Sessions: May 3 — May 5
    Friday, 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Location
UrbanGlass Studio
647 Fulton St
Brooklyn, NY 11217
Instructor

Jenny Crescuillo

Jennifer Crescuillo is an internationally exhibited artist currently living and working in Silver Point, Tennessee with her family.  She received her Master’s of Fine Art in glass at Southern Illinois University Carbondale.  She has taught and worked at various glass studios, such as The Studio of the Corning Museum of Glass, Urban Glass, and Pilchuck Glass School. 

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