Wednesday June 12, 2019 | by Meghan Hayfield

OPENING: Traver Gallery highlights art inspired by nature in two adjacent exhibitions

Adjacent exhibitions now on view at the Traver Gallery in Seattle feature work by artists Jane Rosen and Hiroshi Yamano, both of whom look to the natural environment in appreciation for the world around us. Though united in general interest, Rosen and Yamano use distinctly different approaches to glass and varied materials to illustrate a sensuous connection to the natural world.

The display of Rosen and Yamano’s work in close proximity to one another was purposeful, according to Sarah Traver, director of the gallery. Jane Rosen’s exhibit “Written in Stone” utilizes unique materials such as limestone, glass, coffee, and beeswax, among others, emphasizing a broader need to be mindful of our consumption. Rosen used salvaged wood for her sculptural elements.

Jane Rosen, Calico Markings, 2018. Ink, gouache, watercolor, and beeswax. H 22, W 30 in. courtesy: traver gallery

Rosen's exhbiiton showcases both paintings and sculptures, with the recurring theme of birds laced throughout. Rosen’s work is inspired by the setting of her workspace, which, according to the Traver Gallery website, is “a large light-filled studio perched high above the Pacific ocean.”  In a telephone interview with Glass, Traver said the natural elements surrounding her studio “resonated so strongly with her.”

The birds Rosen depicts so vividly and with careful admiration, are based on the creatures she views from her studio. This depiction is an intensive examination of the interaction between humans and animals, a preoccupation of her work.

The materials Rosen employs -- glass, stone and wood --  all “relate to one another,” and “directly reference what we see in our environment,” Traver added. The textured and variously layered materials foster tactility and variety, which alludes to the richness of the natural world. In addition, the muted colors of the work all mirror the muted colors of a bird’s wings, or the stone she uses as sculptures.

Rosen is “conscious of being mindful of conservation,” Traver continued, and “doesn’t take more from nature than she needs.” This is a valuable reminder for viewers to remain cognizant of their place among natural resources, and understand that even in creating art from nature, we are taking from the planet.


Yamano’s exhibit, titled "Byōbu," centers on the theme of seasons in his native Japan, which have long been a theme of contemplation in Japanese art and literature. “As [Yamano] is aging he is finding it more and more important to be alone and quiet in nature, as well as see how his environment changes with the seasons,” said Traver.

Utilizing mostly blown glass which he paints detailed depictions of birds, flowers, and mountains, Yamano’s works are delicate and intricate. The details within the bird’s wings, for example, or flower petals, are captivating and show careful consideration. The works showcase Yamano’s observations of nature, and ask the viewer to observe and respect those tiny details as well.

Both Rosen and Yamano’s works transcend ordinary narratives to allow for moments of interaction and fleeting beauty in nature to be celebrated. While Rosen utilizes raw materials to draw from the environment she is inspired by, Yamano relies more on observation to paint moments of Japanese seasons. Shown next to each other, the exhibits allow for a “beautiful conversation between the two artists,” Traver explained. The work each artist came to is unique and distinct, though both artists find inspiration from similar themes.

As discourse on how humans have set the environment unto cataclysmic distress, these two exhibitions serve as a reminder to remain aware of humanity's interaction with the planet. There is no heavy-handed message backing the work, but rather an exploration of how observation can allow for natural beauty to be showcased.

IF YOU GO:

Jane Rosen
"Written in Stone"
Through June 29, 2019
Traver Gallery
110 Union Street #200 
Seattle, Washington
Tel: 206.587.6501
Email: info@travergallery.com
Website
Hiroshi Yamano 
"Byōbu"
Through June 29, 2019
Traver Gallery 
110 Union Street #200 
Seattle, Washington
 Tel: 206.587.6501
  Email: info@travergallery.com
Website


GLASS: The UrbanGlass Quarterly, a glossy art magazine published four times a year by UrbanGlass has provided a critical context to the most important artwork being done in the medium of glass for 35 years.