Issue 115 | Summer

Editor's Letter

by Andrew Page

In his back-page essay (Reflection, p. 60), contributing editor James Yood oberves that once artists find success in the so-called "glass world," a kind of artistic paralysis can set in. Whether it's worry about alienating collectors by moving too far from a winning formula, or pressure from gallery owners to produce new work in an established and recognizable style, this state of affairs is full of hazards.

Hourglass

Glass gets special attention at the 2009 Venice Biennale; the glass fashion show will return for the 2009 Glass Art Society conference; Martin Blank unveils an outdoor installation at the Museum of Glass in Tacoma, Washington; a prominent hotel offers its guests Chihuly-esque chandeliers instead of the real thing; Salem County Community College takes the wraps off a state-of-the-art new studio powered by landfill gas.

Reviews

Brad Copping at XEXE Gallery, Toronto; Loren Sandvik at Acuna-Hansen Gallery, Los Angeles; Kait Rhoads at the Museum of Northwest Art, La Conner, Washington; Katherine Gray at Acuna-Hansen Gallery, Los Angeles; Steffen Dam at Heller Gallery, New York; Gregory Nangle at Silica Galleries, Philadelphia.

UrbanGlass News

The 2009 UrbanGlass Gala: Auction • Awards • Glassblowers Ball

Reflection

by James Yood

Can top artists working in glass shake off their stylistic stasis?

Features

Surface Tension

by William V. Ganis

Every step a careful calculation, František Vízner grinds glass into objects that surpass machine perfection.

The Refractionary

by Vicky A. Clark

Perceptions are altered in the undersea world inhabited by Maria Grazia Rosin's sea forms.

Hot Prototyping

by Andrew Page

Setting up its ultra-light portable studio known as GlassLab at design fairs and in design museum courtyards, the Corning Museum of Glass brings the hot glass experience to a new audience.

Handcrafting Concept

by Christian Lewis

Vanessa Yanow blends flameworked glass with intensely worked fiber to question the nature and meaning of what was once called "women's work."

The Second Coming of Lucio

by Andrew Page

Backed by a new art dealer, Lucio Bubacco has taken Venetian flameworking to new heights of scale and complexity. Will it be enough to make him an art star?

GLASS: The UrbanGlass Quarterly, a glossy art magazine published four times a year by UrbanGlass has provided a critical context to the most important artwork being done in the medium of glass for 35 years.