Placeholder
Click here for updates about UrbanGlass' reopening

Thursday January 23, 2020 | by Lindsay Woodruff

OPENING: Alfred University gallery group exhibition references Roni Horn and celebrates the material in cast and kiln-formed glass sculptures


In honor of Michael Rogers being named "artistic associate" of Alfred University's School of Art and Design, as well as the renovation of the school's National Casting Center, an exhibition of cast and kiln-formed glass titled "Saying Glass,” features work by artists affiliated with Alfred University. The group exhibition borrows its title from artist Roni Horn’s monologue Saying Water, a meditation on the element of water and its almost endless range of properties.

Michael Rogers, Spirit Cranes.

“I think about glass in a similar way," says exhibition curator, Alfred assistant professor, and National Casting Center director Karen Donnellan, an accomplished artist in her own right. "Glass is so much more than fragile, and water is so much more than wet." She hopes the exhibition will be able to show viewers -- particularly current glass students -- what is possible with glass.

The exhibition will remain on view view in the school’s Cohen Gallery from January 24 through February 23, 2020, with an opening reception on Friday, January 24, 2020, from 5 PM-8 PM.

Joanna Manousis, Indra's Web.

“Saying Glass” features the diverse work of Michael Rogers and Alfred alumni Andrew Erdos (BFA ’07), Joanna Manousis (MFA ’10), Zora Palova (Randall Chair ’15), and Anjali Srinivasan (BFA ’02). As stated on the exhibition's website, "Their works span in form from the gestural and experimental, to the meticulously crafted, and engineered. This exhibition reflects the far-reaching edges of the visual, material, and conceptual potential, in glass today."



IF YOU GO:

Group Exhibition
“Saying Glass”
January 24, 2020 - February 23, 2020
Alfred University Cohen Gallery
55 N Main St
Alfred, NY 14802
Tel: 607 871 2369
Website

Glass: The UrbanGlass Quarterly, a glossy art magazine published four times a year by UrbanGlass has provided a critical context to the most important artwork being done in the medium of glass for more than 40 years.