Tuesday November 28, 2017 | by Andrew Page

HOT OFF THE PRESSES: The Winter 2017-18 edition of Glass (#149)

The Winter 2017-18 edition of GLASS: The UrbanGlass Art Quarterly (#149) is hitting newsstands and subscriber mailboxes this week. In the cover article, contributing editor William Warmus considers the provocative work of Matthew Szösz, who has refined his experimental inquiries to create glass objects that function as artifacts of a dual nature that values raw spontaneity when executed after meticulous research and disciplined technical execution. To understand what Szösz is up to, Warmus cites Michel Foucault, Giorgio Agamben, and silent-film anti-hero Buster Keaton, before presenting a detailed catalog of the artist's most important series.

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Other features in this issue include critic and curator Vicky A. Clark's provocative essay examining the work of artists who actively subvert the seductive qualities of glass.

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A look at S12, an uncompromising public-access and residency glass center in Bergen, Norway, actively supporting work by emerging artists. This article is the first contribution to Glass by artist and educator Justin Ginsburg.

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Artists Guan Donghai and Han Xi China both lead top university programs in China, and their work balances history and the potentiality of the rapidly expanding field of Chinese glass art.

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And we present the last in our four-part 40th-anniversary series on the history of UrbanGlass, which relaunched after a total rebuild in 2013 as a stronger center for artists using glass.

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All this plus five reviews, an essay on collectors vying to get their collections into museums, and all the latest news from the field.

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Don't miss a single issue, subscribe to Glass today.

GLASS: The UrbanGlass Quarterly, a glossy art magazine published four times a year by UrbanGlass has provided a critical context to the most important artwork being done in the medium of glass for 35 years.